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Happy Endings - 2


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Ursula Borloz

Ursula and her family adopted both their cats from a cat shelter in Moscow. She could not imagine that cat number one, Mingus (the Russian-blue look-alike), would ever get along with another cat as he was very possessive of his territory, but then cat number two, Tobli, came along. Now Mingus is doing a great job at protecting and taking care of his little brother.



Lois Mirkowski (Coudert Brothers Moscow)

I don't have any photos to send at this point, but I can say that I am happy that I was able to rescue my two kitties, Vassya and Tuzik.

Vassya, an adult mixed-breed cat who looks like a purebred Siberian, was literally tossed into the apartment of an elderly woman who never refuses to provide shelter to needy cats. As soon as he realised that he was sharing his space with 25 other cats, he panicked and ran under the bathtub, where he remained for a full week, never coming out even to eat. By the time I received him, he was dirty and underweight. We cleaned him up right away and, within a few weeks of serious eating, he was back in shape again. Best of all, Vassya's loving personality became apparent within moments, and we have been enjoying each other's company ever since.

I found Tuzik, a mixed-breed kitten whose beautiful coat makes everyone think he is part Russian Blue, at the bus-stop near my apartment building one cold night this past November. He was approximately four months old at the time and, besides freezing, he was suffering from thirst, hunger, and eye infection, and an infestation of fleas and worms. His eye infection was so bad that, in the weak light on the street, he looked like a one-eyed cat. Once he was provided with a little warmth, water, food, and veterinary care, however, a sweet and healthy kitten emerged (with both eyes intact!), and now Vassya has an energetic and fun-loving playmate to keep him busy.



Rosalind Bundy (British Embassy Moscow)

Sad story/happy ending: One very cold evening in Moscow I took in a stray cat who had given birth to four kittens. Mum was fairly wild and very unhappy confined indoors, but she was a good mother. One day, when the kittens were about six weeks old, Mum somehow got onto the balcony and, sadly, fell to her death. Fortunately, the kittens were already eating and using the litter tray by themselves. They stayed with me for another five weeks. My own cat took great care of them, washing them, checking up on them and even letting them suckle her for comfort! They all found very good homes and I hear about their progress regularly. They all have very strong and determined personalities, like their Mum!

The "Bundy" Bunch No. 1

The Bundy's No. 2



Vladislav Dubov (Allied Pickfords)

I took to Ulia when I first saw her. She was only three weeks old then, yet she was brave enough to hiss at me trying to protect her kitten sisters. I immediately decided to bring her home and make her part of my feline community.

Ulia and her brother (2000)

Ulia 2003



Note from Vladislav's colleague Barbara: When Vlad adopted Ulia, he already had three cats at home so Ulia is cat number four. Ulia was born at our warehouse in 2000, along with two little brothers and one sister. Mum "Musya" hid them from us, and when we finally found the kittens, they were pretty sick. One of Ulia's little brother didn't make it, and we buried him in a special little spot outside our warehouse. 

The gray baby boy in the picture above was adopted by Russian friend of mine, and sister number two ("Kitty") was adopted by Sarah and Denis. Mother "Musya" was adopted by Amanda McMahon and her family (UK Embassy Moscow) and has since emigrated to the United States. Ulia looks almost exactly like her father "Papusik", who lived at our warehouse for almost two years.

Dad "Papusik"

Mum "Musya"



At the same time our first warehouse kittens were born, our driver brought in another baby kitten he had found. "Belle" was adopted by Tiziana Vigliocco-Cockrell (also from the US Embassy in Moscow) and is now happily living in Washington DC.

After Musya and the kittens were gone from our warehouse, Papusik soon brought in a new girlfriend, who was also called Musya at first but later renamed Mamusya because she, too, had kittens. This was in 2001, and there were five kittens this time. A sixth rescued kitten that needed a surrogate mother was also added to the bunch, and all of them were adopted and have gone on to good new homes.



Maria K. Pulzetti (Director, Chechnya Justice Initiative)

I adopted my two black-and-white kittens Sly and Zina in January. Through the www.expat.ru I got in touch with someone who had taken in two homeless kittens during the deep freeze of December, but needed to give them up since her apartment was already home to two grown cats. They were about three months old at the time, and were already litter-box trained and had had anti-worm treatment.

My roommate and I brought them home with us that very night, and from the beginning I've been surprised at how cuddly they are. I've never before met cats who actually cry to be picked up! They love attention and are very friendly to guests as well. They might have some parrot blood in them, because they love to perch on my shoulder as I cook or clean. Although they are about six months old now, they still sleep together, all tangled up. Having two cats is wonderful because they can play with each other and clean each other.

The veterinarian (whom I found through a friend) has pronounced them healthy, and she gave them all the necessary vaccinations. She'll also help me with their papers when I bring them home to the U.S. with me. Moscow veterinarians make house calls as a matter of practice, which is unbelievably convenient!

All in all, I highly recommend adopting pets in Moscow. There are a lot of homeless animals who have great potential to turn your apartment into a home. Also, veterinary care and food are less expensive than in the U.S. The only problem I have had with Sly and Zina is that they knock over absolutely everything - plants, vases, books, even the bathroom shelves. But they are so much fun that I don't mind occasionally straightening up after them.


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